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Jameson Cook
Jameson Cook

Fundamentals Of Complex Analysis With Applications To Engineering Science And Mathematics.pdf



Restricted to students in the College of Natural Sciences. Introduction to the theory of differential calculus of functions of one variable, and its application to the natural sciences. Subjects may include limits and differentiation, with applications to rates of change, extremes, graphing, and exponential growth and decay. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403K, 408C, 408K, 408N, 408Q, 408R. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the mathematics placement exam or Mathematics 305G with a grade of at least B-.




Fundamentals of Complex Analysis with Applications to Engineering Science and Mathematics.pdf



A calculus course for students in the life sciences. Emphasizes representations and analysis of data. Subjects include functions, rates, and derivatives and their applications to problems in biology; differential equations; Riemann integrals; the Euler method; and fundamental theorems of calculus. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403K, 408C, 408K, 408N, 408Q, 408R. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the mathematics placement exam or Mathematics 305G with a grade of at least B-.


Restricted to students in the College of Natural Sciences. Introduction to the theory of integral calculus of functions of one variable, and its applications to the natural sciences. Subjects may include integration and its application to area and volume, and transcendental functions, sequences, and series and their application to numerical methods. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403L, 408L (or 308L), 408S. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C, 408K, or 408N with a grade of at least C-, or Mathematics 408R or 408Q with a grade of at least B.


Restricted to students in a teacher preparation program or who have consent of instructor. Study of number-related topics in middle-grade and secondary school mathematics. Topics include place value; meanings of arithmetic operations; analysis of computation methods; historical development of number concepts and notation; and rational, irrational, algebraic, transcendental, and complex numbers. Emphasis is on communicating mathematics, developing pedagogical understanding of concepts and notation, and using both informal reasoning and proof. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D, 408L, or 408S with a grade of at least C-.


Matrices, elements of vector analysis and calculus of functions of several variables, including gradient, divergence, and curl of a vector field, multiple integrals and chain rules, length and area, line and surface integrals, Green's theorems in the plane and space, and, if time permits, complex analysis. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D, 408L, or 408S with a grade of at least C-.


Introduction to mathematical properties of numerical methods and their applications in computational science and engineering. Introduction to object-oriented programming in an advanced language. Study and use of numerical methods for solutions of linear systems of equations; nonlinear least-squares data fitting; numerical integration; and solutions of multidimensional nonlinear equations and systems of initial value ordinary differential equations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Computer Science 303E and Mathematics 341 or 340L with a grade of at least C-.


Invariance, vector algebra and calculus, integral theorems, general coordinates, introductory differential geometry and tensor analysis, applications. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427J, 427K, or 427L with a grade of at least C-.


Tools for studying differential equations and optimization problems that arise in the engineering and physical sciences. Includes dimensional analysis and scaling, regular and singular perturbation methods, optimization and calculus of variations, and stability. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427J or 427K, and Mathematics 340L, 341, or 311 with a grade of at least C- in each.


Arithmetic is one of the most basic branches of mathematics and deals with numbers and their applications in many ways. Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division are used as the basic groundwork to solve a large number of questions and progress into more complex concepts like exponents, limits, and many other types of calculations. This is one of the most important branches because its fundamentals are used in everyday life for a variety of reasons from simple calculations to profit and loss computation.


Topology is a much recent addition to the branches of Mathematics list. It is concerned with the deformations in different geometrical shapes under stretching, crumpling, twisting and bedding. Deformations like cutting and tearing are not included in topologies. Its application can be observed in differentiable equations, dynamical systems, knot theory, and Riemann surfaces in complex analysis.


MATH 1325 - Mathematics for Business Applications IIHours: 3This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and social sciences. This course is not a substitute for MATH 2413, Calculus I. Prerequisites: MATH 1314 or 1324 with a minimum grade of C.


MATH 2305 - Discrete MathematicsHours: 3A course designed to prepare math, computer science, and engineering majors for a background in abstraction, notation, and critical thinking for the mathematics most directly related to computer science.Topics include: logic, relations, functions, basic set theory, countability and counting arguments, proof techniques, mathematical induction, combinatorics, discrete probability, recursion, sequence and recurrence, elementary number theory, graph theory, and mathematical proof techniques Prerequisites: MATH 2413 Calculus I with a minimum grade of C.


MATH 2318 - Linear AlgebraHours: 3Introduces and provides models for application of the concepts of vector algebra. Topics include finite dimensional vector spaces and their geometric significance; representing and solving systems of linear equations using multiple methods, including Gaussian elimination and matrix inversion; matrices;determinants; linear transformations; quadratic forms; eigenvalues and eigenvector; and applications in science and engineering. Prerequisites: MATH 2414 with a minimum grade of C or Math 192 with a minimum grade of C.


MATH 316 - Mathematical Methods in Physics & EngineeringHours: 3Mathematical techniques from the following areas: infinite series; integral transforming; applications of complex variables; vectors, matrices, and tensors; special functions; partial differential equations; Green's functions; perturbation theory; integral equations; calculus of variations; and groups and group representatives. Prerequisites: MATH 2415 Calculus III or Math 314 with "C" or higher, or consent of instructor.


MATH 326 - Applied MathematicsHours: 3This course introduces current techniques in mathematical modeling, computer simulations, and the applications of algorithmic programming. Topics may include continuous and discrete models, modeling with graphs, difference equations and differential equations, elements of dynamical systems, graph theory, and simulating with Monte Carlo algorithms. Case studies from biology, atmospheric sciences, ecology, engineering, social science and economics may be discussed in detail. Prerequisites: "C" or higher in MATH 2320 or 315.


Mathematics is essential in the natural sciences, engineering, medicine, finance, computer science and the social sciences. Although mathematics is extensively used for modeling phenomena, the fundamental truths of mathematics are independent from any scientific experimentation. Some areas of mathematics, such as statistics and game theory, are developed in close correlation with their applications and are often grouped under applied mathematics. Other areas are developed independently from any application (and are therefore called pure mathematics), but often later find practical applications.[6][7] The problem of integer factorization, for example, which goes back to Euclid in 300 BC, had no practical application before its use in the RSA cryptosystem, now widely used for the security of computer networks.


These problems and debates led to a wide expansion of mathematical logic, with subareas such as model theory (modeling some logical theories inside other theories), proof theory, type theory, computability theory and computational complexity theory.[25] Although these aspects of mathematical logic were introduced before the rise of computers, their use in compiler design, program certification, proof assistants and other aspects of computer science, contributed in turn to the expansion of these logical theories.[63]


Computational mathematics is the study of mathematical problems that are typically too large for human, numerical capacity.[68][69] Numerical analysis studies methods for problems in analysis using functional analysis and approximation theory; numerical analysis broadly includes the study of approximation and discretization with special focus on rounding errors.[70] Numerical analysis and, more broadly, scientific computing also study non-analytic topics of mathematical science, especially algorithmic-matrix-and-graph theory. Other areas of computational mathematics include computer algebra and symbolic computation.


An example of the first case is the theory of distributions, introduced by Laurent Schwartz for validating computations done in quantum mechanics, which became immediately an important tool of (pure) mathematical analysis.[118] An example of the second case is the decidability of the first-order theory of the real numbers, a problem of pure mathematics that was proved true by Alfred Tarski, with an algorithm that is impossible to implement because of a computational complexity that is much too high.[119] For getting an algorithm that can be implemented and can solve systems of polynomial equations and inequalities, George Collins introduced the cylindrical algebraic decomposition that became a fundamental tool in real algebraic geometry.[120]


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